Before me sits the most fantastic jar of candy, a nuclear bomb of goodness. Not only is it the best orange candy in the world, but its amazingly homemade.

Homemade candy this good has a catch though- it takes 2 – 3 weeks to make. So steel yourself and find that zen place of candy patience in your heart. It will be worth it, I promise.

candy orange slicesWhat makes these candied orange slices better than the easier candied orange peel? These candied orange slices retain their pulpy fruit and are steeped in a sugar solution without heat. This minimal use of heat offers up an orange candy that has a more juicy, lighter fruity flavor than candied orange peels have.

Candy Orange Slices

modified version of procedure for candying fruit by Jean-Pierre Wybauw in Fine Chocolates, p70. Wybauw’s method utilizes a sugar refractometer- the following method doesn’t.

Fruit Prep:

Blanching:

Candying:

Drying and dipping
The orange slices are removed from the sugar solution. Finishing can take multiple different routes:
arrange on a drying rack out at room temperature till less tacky, 1-2 days then

Storage of finished candies
In an air tight container is best to keep out humidity. I gifted these in glass canning jars or crunchy cellophane bags. The survivors of my nibbling suggest that these candies hold up well: at least a month, probably more.

Variations
The subject of your candying is the first variation that leaps to my mind. Keeping your choices in the citrus family is easy:

Finding other fruits and vegetables for this process would be a great experiment too. I don’t know what the parameters for likely subjects are. But here’s some ideas:

I’d love to hear what you try.

A long process- yes. But the bounty if offers will reward you and your friends over and over.

Cheers

102 Comments

posted January 12th, 2009 at 9:26 pm

Wow, Jocelyn, these are gorgeous! I can’t wait to try them.

posted January 13th, 2009 at 5:46 am

I have Wybauw’s book and have read through this recipe. Never dared to start though ;) Good to know it really makes a difference. Your orange quarters look delicious!

posted January 13th, 2009 at 6:00 am

Hey there Jocelyn ~ I will be giving this recipe a try. I can only imagine the delightful aromas that will escape from the kitchen. Thanks for stopping by my page to say howdy…I love your site…that is why you are on my sidebar…cha, cha, cha!

Happy Tuesday.

Ramona

posted January 13th, 2009 at 8:22 am

Oh, such good childhood memories with this post! My mom used to make candied orange rind sometimes for fruitcake. This is absolutely my weekend project.

posted January 13th, 2009 at 8:44 am

OK, now you know I have to try this. For lemons (since that’s what I still have a ton of) would you recommend the chocolate or just a sugar coating?

thanks for the inspiration!

dot

DOh- why didn’t I answer this here?
I think lemons would be great either:
-with a dark chocolate coating
- a white chocolate coating
- or a dusting of ascorbic acid (canning supplies) and sugar for a pucker effect

yum!

–McAuliflower

- dot
posted January 13th, 2009 at 8:49 am

oh, quick question – how many oranges did you do with this amount of sugar/water? I would assume you could do a smaller amount with less as long as you kept the proportions the same?

I think the basics of what matter are:
- blanch the sliced fruits in boiling water
- keep covered in sugared water
- increase that sugar percentage almost daily

–McAuliflower

- dot
posted January 13th, 2009 at 11:34 am

Love making candied orange rind dipped in chocolate. I always try to buy organic but for some reason, the skins always seem to be thinner and don’t work as nicely.

I bought Organic too. I think the skin thickness would depend on the variety / breeding of the fruit.

–McAuliflower

posted January 13th, 2009 at 5:51 pm

Those candies look sooooo scrumptious!
I love your blog. You always have such interesting cooking projects!

- Mimi
posted January 13th, 2009 at 6:50 pm

Hi Dot- I did three large oranges. And yes- you could do a smaller amount with the same ratios. This was a good sized batch for Christmas time gift giving. Smaller would be better off season.

posted January 13th, 2009 at 6:50 pm

Ya know- a white chocolate on lemons could be very very nice. I can also imagine a dark bittersweet chocolate too. I think you have lots of options at your fingertips!

posted January 13th, 2009 at 6:53 pm

Just a note Laura- to candy just the orange rind is quicker and a separate post. This one here is for candying the whole fruit (in slice form), pulp and all. Here’s the candied orange peel procedure I use.

posted January 13th, 2009 at 6:55 pm

I’ve had that longing for this recipe for such a long time. Something this season just snapped! :) You’ll note I didn’t do his final step (the rub the side of the pot to initiate crystallization). If you do and feel it makes a difference- let me know. I was just happy to get over my geek point of thinking I needed a refractometer (though I still kind of want one- eBay could be a bad enabler here!).

posted January 14th, 2009 at 2:30 pm

This past summer, despite some warnings in other books against doing so, I candied some strawberries using JPW’s method. Considering the fragile nature of ripe Hoods, I opted to leave them whole and used the smallest berries I had on hand. I still have a few left, 7 months later, and they seem to be holding up OK (JPW says they should keep up to a year).

I was going to try some candying other fruits but I got sidetracked with other projects and the other fruits never got candied. Maybe next summer. Your post got me thinking about candied fruit again, and I have a couple of lemons in the kitchen that are potential victims.

- David
posted January 18th, 2009 at 6:42 am

I was trying to work out how I could use up more oranges. I started a batch of these yesterday:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/sylvia/sets/72157612681317068/

posted January 18th, 2009 at 11:26 pm

I just wanted to say that “a rumpus in a fruit bowl” is good! (LOVED that comment!) LOL.. Just got here so back to brousing this neat blog! Have a great week.

- Mona
posted February 4th, 2009 at 12:42 pm

This is very cool! Thanks. You’ll have to tell Orangette, who named her food blog after candied orange peels :)

posted February 5th, 2009 at 7:55 pm

I would love to try this recipe, but I can’t figure out what you mean by – 1 kg of sugar and 600 g of water, and-
100g of sugar. How much is that in standard American measurements? Thanks Jen

Jen- those are weights. You are going to have to weigh the ingredients to get an accurate measurement.
If you want volumetric measurements- just google your conversion question. (Ex: google How many cups in 1 kg – sugar?).

Hope that helps

–McAuliflower

posted March 1st, 2009 at 9:07 pm

1 g = 1 ml of water: 600 ml = 2.5 cups

WikiAnswers says that 100 g sugar is 0.44 cup (I’d imagine using 1/2 cup is safe?). So 1 kg sugar is between 4 1/3 c and 4 1/2 cups.

This page should be helpful too: http://www.jsward.com/cooking/conversion.shtml

PS: I’m looking forward to trying this with blood oranges! If it works well, I may try grapefruit too.

posted March 2nd, 2009 at 6:33 am

I miss your writings… Wassup?

thanks for the nudge Joe :)
Travel being sick, missing my taste buds, being sick…

will get a post up pronto.

–McAuliflower

- Joe
posted March 19th, 2009 at 8:45 pm

[...] happened to leave/submit/forget a handful or orange slices from my Christmas candied orange slices in their final sugar solution for and additional 3 [...]

posted March 20th, 2009 at 7:20 am

I might try this recipe for Christmas this year. It’s a long process, but I’m sure one that’s nicely rewarded in the end.

Sylvia, I looked at your flickr photos of your orange slices and am wondering what brand is your 8-cup measuring cup that you used?

- Angie
posted March 26th, 2009 at 7:54 am

I made these and they were wonderful!

We have a navel orange tree that provides copious but less than sweet fruit, so I picked a few for this recipe. I have to admit that I wasn’t too sure about the safety of unrefrigerated sugar syrup, so I actually brought the syrup just to a boil each time I added more sugar.

After drying for a couple of days, I tossed the slices in sugar as directed and dipped them halfway in 72% chocolate. They’re so sweet on their own that I really think the chocolate provides the perfect balance.

Every single person who tried them LOVED them. My coworker actually did a happy dance in the office (and he’s a foodie who’s hard to impress!) when he ate his first one. It’s a joy to behold a 6’4″ burly guy doing a happy dance over food.

Sadly, they are all gone. Happily, there are many more oranges on the tree….

- Ketra
posted March 26th, 2009 at 7:56 am

Oh, and it seems to me that the leftover sugar syrup really should be used in some sort of cocktail, infused as it is with delicious orangey-ness. Maybe with tart pomegranate juice and vodka?

- Ketra
posted April 5th, 2009 at 8:12 am

This looks amazing!! I have bookmarked it and am going to make it soon :)

posted May 20th, 2009 at 4:27 am

My mouth is watering!!!

posted June 27th, 2009 at 5:49 pm

A couple questions:
1. Why do they need to be blanched? Why can’t you just skip this step?
2. Why don’t you just start out with a thick syrup solution to begin with and let the oranges sit? Is this because liquid from the oranges is released into the solution, making it necessary to add more sugar in order to get the sugar content back up?

- Curious
posted June 28th, 2009 at 12:10 pm

[...] Points does it again.. More Citrus inspiration: I’m going to have to try this recipe for the best candied orange slices in the world. (But probably with Lemon – Like my Candied Lemon Peel from last [...]

posted July 9th, 2009 at 3:06 pm

I tried this with pineapple and it turned out wonderfully. I am using it to decorate the pina colada cupcakes I am experimenting with. Beautiful. Well worth the effort.

posted July 22nd, 2009 at 5:36 am

A dear friend of mine has recently done candied blood oranges – I completely overdid the coffee/dessert session with these delicious treats. I am very keen to do lemons and my questions is: My lemons are the thick skinned, therefore very thick pith. Does this make a difference? It is quite soft so I assume will shrink in the process?? Thank you all for such GREAT ideas!

- Sal
posted August 18th, 2009 at 5:52 pm

[...] Candied jalapeños, make use of these directions for making candied fruit. Instead of using oranges, submerge jalapeño slices in the sugar solution instead. [...]

posted August 26th, 2009 at 11:54 am

[...] Candied jalapeños, make use of these directions for making candied fruit. Instead of using oranges, submerge jalapeño slices in the sugar solution instead. [...]

posted August 29th, 2009 at 6:29 pm

[...] Photo-recipe was inspired by Brownie Points (such a lovely blog!) recipe for “The Best Candied Orange Slices in the World” My parents had an abundance of lemons, and I needed to find things to do with the ones they [...]

posted October 26th, 2009 at 8:24 pm

What is the salt concentration for blanching?

- Rae
posted November 19th, 2009 at 6:07 am

I’m also wondering how much salt you put in to have it be properly “salted” water?

Don’t stress it- just add a pinch. Yep- I just gave you an obtuse undefined amount :)
Or you can follow the pasta rule: make it as salty as the ocean.

–McAuliflower

- Kathy
posted November 22nd, 2009 at 8:40 am

[...] got a few sewing projects prepped and ready to begin.  I’ll also probably make some of these orange candies (or these ones), and definitely we’ve got fleur de sel caramels on our list this year (There [...]

posted December 2nd, 2009 at 9:15 am

I started a batch yesterday….What do you think about the upper limit of how many oranges could be made in this amount of solution? I have doubled the oranges, and the solution, but it looks like a lot of extra syrup–probably 6inches above the tops of my oranges in this particular container. I’m wondering if I could have just used the same sugar water as if I’d made a single batch?
Thoughts?

Hi Kathryn,

I just started a batch that fits 4 large navel oranges into this size of sugar solution. It’s a tight fit. You should be fine adding more orange if you feel you have a lot of empty solution space.

Have fun!

–McAuliflower

- Kathryn
posted December 4th, 2009 at 1:48 pm

I’m delighted to stumble over your recipe! Thank you! I make sugared cranberries (from the Whole Foods recipe) and they are a huge hit. The cranberries are done overnight. I’m excited to learn a new holiday trick. I can hardly wait for the final product.

I put mine in a brown paper bag and pushed them back in a corner of the countertop. I can’t spare a cupboard. Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!

- sydney
posted December 6th, 2009 at 12:35 pm

[...] Chocolate covered candied orange slices. [...]

posted December 16th, 2009 at 2:02 pm

Hi-

I just made chocolate dipped candied orange peels for Christmas and thought next year I’ld like to do the same with fruit candied with the pulp intact. That brought me to your recipe and tutorial. They look fabulous and the variations sound too good to overlook too.

Tell me, if you would, would you also blanch things like pineapple slices and whole apricots? Do you know what would happen to the flavors if you had mixed fruits in the same macerating syrup?

Thanks so much. I’m really looking forward to starting these right after our Thanksgiving for next Christmas.

Merry, merry to one and all!

- rainey
posted December 19th, 2009 at 6:16 pm

hi all, just a little info for people who are thinking of trying to do candied lime slices.. my experience with candied limes suggests that it does not work, when i made the attempt they came out with a very bitter flavour and a very “off” undertone.. i don’t know how to describe it.. it just tasted wrong. I was using key limes and the same sugar solution as for orange slices. I was unable to eat the results. i don’t know if others have tried this, but i would suggest caution.

interesting results Deanna. I wonder if they need more bouts of blanching?
Also- did you use organic limes?

–McAuliflower

- deanna
posted December 22nd, 2009 at 11:35 pm

Just finished this recipe with Oranges and Meyer Lemons. I also did limes but, as deanna above said, did not taste right. I threw them away.

I still have the separate syrups for the orange and lemon. Any ideas on what I can do with the syrup?

- Dave
posted December 29th, 2009 at 6:26 pm

[...] Chocolate covered candied orange slices. [...]

posted January 1st, 2010 at 4:40 pm

WOW I loved them. Mine took a full week to dry since it’s humid where I live.

I’m starting another batch. These are absolutely wonderful. Mom’s gone, but I remember how much she loved to find confectioners who offered these. Over the years we could only find jellies that looked like this. They are just not as good. Finding this recipe was a great Christmas present. Thank you for sharing.

And, thanks to the others for warning me about the limes. They were a condidate I was considering.

- Sydney
posted January 2nd, 2010 at 3:36 pm

Just finished the recipe. I left the oranges in the jar full of sugar solution for an extra week while I was gone on vacation. When I returned I found small clear to white structures floating on the top of the syrup. I can’t tell if they are sugar crystals or mold. Has anyone else experienced this?

- Kay
posted January 22nd, 2010 at 6:55 pm

Here’s a challenge – I’ve been looking for a recipe for a truly decadent treat I got at Fortnum & Mason – Candied Oranges. Tiny, whole oranges candied and dipped in dark chocolate! Heaven! We sat at the theatre with juice running down our arms, but it was worth every lick!

- Dale Mabry
posted January 27th, 2010 at 7:55 am

I am dying to make these, they look amazing :)

I am lacking in cool dark places in my house that aren’t over run by children, would the darkest section of my bedroom work, since I rarely turn on the light over there? It’s not quite in my closet, but near it… I’d have to bring the bowl down to the kitchen every day though…

Also, can I do different thicknesses in the same batch? Or do they need to be uniformly sliced?

I am excited, and hoping to start these today or tomorrow :)

posted January 29th, 2010 at 6:46 pm

Sandwich the slices between two rounds of thinly rolled marzipan, cut into four wedges, enrobe each wedge in dark chocolate.

- lisa 2e
posted March 28th, 2010 at 9:30 am

what can we do with the left over sugar
thanks
carole.m.

You can bottle it up to sweeten drinks- iced tea, lemonade, mixed drinks…

You can boil it up to make a batch of caramel. Boil it till it is brunette colored, then add cream and or butter and salt.

–McAuliflower

- carole marcotte
posted March 30th, 2010 at 12:00 pm

Hi,

I’ve never tried this before, but am attempting it (because it looks delicious!). I just had a question –after submerging the orange slices in the sugar syrup, are we supposed to leave the container open? Or should it be in a closed container?

Just want to make sure I don’t end up breeding botulism in a jar instead of making candy! =P Thanks.

Go ahead and put a lid on it- it will help reduce the chances of mold spores settling down into the syrup.

–McAuliflower

- Jane
posted April 7th, 2010 at 1:47 am

I chose to use the Brownie Points recipe for candied fruit over several others that I had seen on-line. I much preferred the outcome of this method compared to the “cooking” method I had previously tried. Faster is not always better.

I used 6 small-sized naval oranges in the amount of solution in the recipe. There was room for more fruit, but that was all I had. This did not affect the outcome. I used a tall canister type glass jar without the lid and put a drinking glass (with water in it) down in the top to hold the oranges under the syrup.

I let them process at room temp and the container was not air-tight. The first batch I turned out using this two-week soaking process was excellent. I left some pieces plain and dipped some in dark semi-sweet chocolate. Everybody wanted more. Sooo…

The next batch I put up to process (which is just coming to the end of the 2 week period) has started to smell and taste fermented. The syrup has turned cloudy. Also, the oranges have not become translucent or tender in the syrup. I did everything the same as I did with the first batch with the following differences:
Since lots of juice ran out of cut-up oranges. I put some of that juice (about 1/2 cup) in place of some of the water when making the initial syrup. I have kept this batch in an air-tight glass canister. Also, I did not allow the syrup/oranges to cool down before I put the air-tight lid on the canister after adding more sugar.

I’m wondering what (of the above differences in processing) has caused the problem or if all contributed. Has anyone else had these characteristics occur and what was cause/outcome?

At the same time as this second batch of oranges, I applied the process to some fresh ginger root pieces. These do not smell or taste fermented and are translucent and tender. The syrup is not cloudy. The only difference here: no fruit juice in the syrup. I’m thinking that the juice in the syrup is the problem, all other things being equal.

I don’t know if the fermented taste and smell is a health risk, but the taste is definitely not as pleasant and the texture is not as it should be prior to the drying process. Well, we live and learn, huh? I’m doing lemons next.

Has anyone tried this process with black berries or raspberries?

- Elaine
posted May 12th, 2010 at 8:15 pm

I’m actually on day 3 of this recipe!

The one problem I’m faced with, is that there are sugar crystals forming at the bottom of my container. I’ve been following the recipe to a tee.

Is this normal? Any way around this?

Crystals forming is a risk with any saturated solution. Tip to avoid crystals- use a very clean container that has a very smooth surface. Crystals will grow when they find a rough spot or bump to nucleate from.

I think its ok for the process if you have them. If its easy to do, chip them off and heat them in your solution to dissolve, or transfer your solution and oranges to a new clean container- don’t worry, you won’t have to start over, just pick up where you left off.

Hope this works
–McAuliflower

- Zach
posted May 24th, 2010 at 6:24 pm

JUST reached the end of the 2week process – and they turned out FANtastic! Thank you for posting this recipe! A couple of points…

- I didn’t add sugar each day, more like every 2nd day.
- I missed adding sugar for 2-3 days at teh end of teh recipe … not sure if it was due to this, but when I came back much of the solution had crystalized and turned almost into a glue. I heated the bowl in the sun (and then the oven on low heat for a few mins) which was enough to free the orange pieces – but the oranges slices still had lots of crystalized sugar stuck on. So I soaked each slice in hot water for ~2 mins, shook them dry, then laid them out to dry – thankfully, that did the trick, and they turned out fab!
- added some water and then reduced the leftover solution, makes a great orange syrup!

Question – if I do the same process with just orange peels, do you expect that the soaking in sugar solution time could be reduced by a week?

Thanks for the feedback Ali.
As too a shortened soaking time with just peels- I suspect not. However, you could use the more traditional method of simmering the peels in sugar syrup, as detailed here.

Have fun!
–McAuliflower

- Ali S
posted June 1st, 2010 at 9:53 am

I was so excited to try this recipe after eating candied oranges in Paris. On the 4th day the liquid was cloudy and smelled like it was fermenting. It foamed up when I added the sugar. Should I start over or continue? Each time I added sugar and heated the liquid, I would just heat and stir until the sugar was dissolved. Should I have brought it almost to boiling? Would that prevent fermenting?

- Cindy
posted June 1st, 2010 at 4:09 pm

i recently came across this page, and immediately decided to try it out with some lemons. the results: FABULOUS! love it love it love it!
blogged (with a link to this page) here: http://leftofaverage-southofnormal.blogspot.com/2010/06/mystery-project-resolved.html

this is a very interesting blog! thank you!

posted June 1st, 2010 at 4:12 pm

@cindy: cloudiness and odor definately indicates bacteria (and early fermentation, most likely!)
which means that either the blanching wasn’t quite long enough, a utensil was contaminated, or some airborn bacteria got into the container. Personally, i’d start fresh, and make sure you bring the liquid to a simmer at least once a week, not just enough to dissolve the crystals. however, that’s just a personal opinion.

posted June 26th, 2010 at 6:53 am

After 6 days there is mold on the lemons. What did I do wrong? I blanched lemons and limes and have added the sugar each day, didn’t bring the new sugar solution to a boil, should I toss it out and start over?
I’m really eager to get it right before kumquat season as this is exactly what I remember for sugared kumquats. Thanks!

- ida
posted October 28th, 2010 at 5:44 am

Hi,
These sound terrific. Being that I am a huge fan of Chocolate Orange Peels. I make candy and sell it. I designed my labels and packaging.
I have a process that is not so long for the orange peels and they come out great. You can’t eat just one.
I would love to try your recipe for the fun of it. Thanks for the info.

posted December 1st, 2010 at 6:48 am

How many days do you readd sugar to the slices?

- marie
posted December 1st, 2010 at 6:55 am

never mind. While coping the recipe i realized you did state the time. Thanks

- marie
posted December 2nd, 2010 at 1:05 pm

Hi! I’m almost finished with my first batch of homemade homegrown “Satsuma Smiles” using your recipe. I would love to use the liquid for caramels. Could you give us some more information on how to do it? Thanks so much!

- sandy
posted December 11th, 2010 at 3:16 pm

So….. where is toilet? Hehe))) Joke, relax ;)
Thanks

- LorencoMip
posted December 17th, 2010 at 8:29 am

Just finished my first batch last night. Delish!!! Hi Sandy, did you figure out how to make the caramels? I have an idea and am going to try a batch today.

- Nancy
posted December 20th, 2010 at 5:20 am

Thank you for this truly amazing recipe! I was hesitant to try it due to the time commitment, but happy I did! I probably missed three days of adding sugar over the course of the two weeks.

Living in Miami, Florida, we have high humidity issues, not to mention bugs, so leaving the orange slices out to dry for a day or two is a serious issue. I drained the slices for a few minutes then put them in a food dehydrater for about six hours, moving the layers hourly. This worked fantastic! When the slices were only slightly tacky, I coated them in sugar and layered them individually in a airtight container.

Perfection, now I want to dip them in chocolate, but, again the humidity affects the tempered chocolate and if my beautiful orange slices get that moldy looking bloom, my heart will break!

- Betsy
posted December 23rd, 2010 at 8:02 pm

@Betsy – thanks for posting that, I’m from Miami as well and own a dehydrator so I was trying to figure out how long would be good enough to give this a try.

Thank you for posting the time length!

- Amber
posted December 30th, 2010 at 7:55 am

I just tried this recipe and the result is amazing. Thank you!

posted January 1st, 2011 at 9:51 am

[...] que j’ai trouvé quelques minutes plus tard sur un blogue qui citait en toutes lettres : Recette des meilleures oranges confites au monde. La promesse était grande et je n’en demandais pas [...]

posted January 2nd, 2011 at 4:18 am

Hi there,
Just wanted to let you know that I gave this a go this Christmas and the results are fantastic! I was initially a bit hesitant because of the length of time, but I much preferred this method to boiling them in the sugar syrup etc. When my orages were finished I left half of the batch just as they were, my sister liked the juicier taste of these, and dipped the remaining half of the batch in dark chocolate, these make a wonderful smell when you open the lid to pick one out! Can’t wait to set up my next batch. Thanks for sharing this great recipe :)

- EJ
posted January 15th, 2011 at 6:58 am

Dont touch WIKILEAKS, faked DEMOCRACY!!!
Thank you
bye bye ;) )

- Assangerix
posted June 4th, 2011 at 6:27 pm

Dale Mabry, on the off chance you visit this page again–There is a recipe for preserved whole kumquats in The Joy of Cooking that might do what you are looking for. I found it when looking for a recipe for candied orange slices.

I was going to try this with key limes–I’m glad I ran across these comments before wasting my efforts!

- tjewell
posted July 16th, 2011 at 1:12 am

[...] one hand, this recipe for candied oranges seems like a summary of why everyone these days is so dang overweight. A total of 3.4 kilograms of [...]

posted October 9th, 2011 at 4:34 pm

my mother really wants to make these but she failed at makeing penut butter cookies the easyst thing to make not to mention sugar cookies any help for my mothers sake? XD

- sarah
posted December 8th, 2011 at 6:04 am

Well my personal notes on these is as follows.
1. Make sure everything is clean… sounds obvious but just remember to do it.
2. While blanching the oranges or fruit of choice dont worry if they already float, just keep them in for about 2-3 minutes. Oranges you can tell are finished by the change in color on the fruit.
3. You can skip days, the recipe isnt picky. Shortening the time however ends badly.
4. If your really worried about mold or something growing during the process first check to see if the location you picked is “safe” no pets going to stick their noses in it, or dust. This is easily done by simply keeping the fruit in a pot and placing the lid ontop :P
5. I use a cold location, in my case a stone windowsill (inside) with the window behind it cracked open. This is in fall, now that it is winter I leave the window closed.

Also, if you add more then 100g sugar that last day the solution is just about perfect for making rock candy, simply pour the remaining solution into small smooth containers and hang a BBQ Skewer (or similar) into the solution. Let them sit someplace *undisturbed* until they look done. And presto bio-flavored rock candy.

- Wyrsa
posted December 12th, 2011 at 7:12 am

I commented on this back in 2009. I have made these the last two years and wanted to update my experience. These are a huge hit and now, starting in early November we start to get queries as to if I am making them again. Each time I have upped the number I’m making as there are never enough. This year I did 24 oranges (plus the end rinds cut into strips–seems a shame to waste) and a double batch of solution is the perfect amount to cover them all. I keep them in a 16qt covered stock pot on my counter. I pour out as much of the solution each day that fits comfortable into a 3qt saucepan for the reheating. It seems to work fine and I’ve had not problem with mold or fermentation. I take them out of the final soak today.
I thought I had jotted the proportion of citric acid that I added to my sugar for coating, but I can’t seem to find it. I guess I’ll taste as I go and will be sure to write it down this year.
THANK YOU for sharing such a wonderful recipe–I’d be inclined to be selfish with this one!

- Kathryn
posted December 21st, 2011 at 3:10 pm

I have made these orange slices for the second year for Christmas I have a huge jar of the syrup left – do you think it’s possible to make a nut brittle with the syrup. Thank you

- Meg
posted January 19th, 2012 at 6:12 am

For the second year I make this recipe!
It’s amazing!
Thank you who shared with us!

- Voula
posted February 12th, 2012 at 9:39 pm

[...] Candy Slices Recipe, adapted from Brownie Points [...]

posted April 4th, 2012 at 6:24 am

Submit Comment

- carpinteyrowmr
posted April 27th, 2012 at 11:23 am

Another caveat: Don’t mix different fruits together in the same batch. Or at least don’t mix them with grapefruit. I made a batch of orange, lemon, lime and grapefruit, and every piece tastes like grapefruit.

I used the lime because I had bought it before I read the comments not to use them. Once I had it, I thought I would try to figure out why they don’t work. I’m certainly no expert, but it seems like the limes don’t get soft, regardless of how long you cook them. I cooked some of them longer just to see, but the skin was still tough.

The cool thing is that you can even use the ends of the fruits. I initially cut them off but then decided to throw them in, and they’re just as soft as the pulpy pieces.

Also, I think I’ll lean toward thicker rather than thinner in my next batch. I was aiming for 1/8″, but most of the pulp fell out during cooking, so I ended up with candied rinds (except for those darned limes; they stayed together like nobody’s business).

- Laura K
posted May 15th, 2012 at 11:28 am

Two questions: Has anyone tried infusing the oranges in honey instead of sugar syrup? How about adding horseradish to the infusion? (I’m trying to figure out a way to make horseradish-infused candied/dried oranges to add some kick.)

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